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DABKE … in images

DABKE … in images

Repertory Dance Theatre (RDT)  had a wonderful weekend of performing April 6-8, 2017 RDT’s Season closer DABKE, one of the dancers’ favorite pieces to perform. We had three straight nights of standing ovations, heartfelt comments from audience members, and an amazing emotional connection to the work and to the audience.

RDT dancer Efren Corado Garcia epitomizes the gratitude and enthusiasm of all of the dancers when he reported,

“We are so lucky to be able to live in a community which supports the arts in such a heartfelt manner. The audience we had the last few nights was generous, gracious and kind. I’ll always remember your engagement with the work as we poured ourselves onto the stage. Thank you from all of us!”

We will be staging an encore performance of DABKE this weekend at the Egyptian Theatre in Park City, UT (April 14-15, 2017). Learn more>>

Enjoy these images from photographer Sharon Kain.

 

 

VOYAGE: RDT takes you on a trip through World Dance

VOYAGE: RDT takes you on a trip through World Dance

Using the Utah Core Curriculum Standards for Dance, Social Studies and Language Arts, Repertory Dance Theatre presented a special matinee to over 1,500 students last week at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center.

American Modern Dance is a rich tapestry which has been influenced by the music and movement of cultures worldwide. Dance has been part of community life as a form of communication, empowerment, and entertainment for centuries. Rhythms and patterns gathered from Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and the Americas connect the past with the present to illustrate how dance can document history and culture and tell our collective story. Take your own voyage below with some highlights of the concert. You can see excerpts from Voyage Saturday, March 11 at 11:00 AM at RDT’s Ring Around the Rose.

DANCES FROM ACROSS THE GLOBE

Dance from Africa

The first dances were prayers designed to send messages to the gods … they insured a bountiful harvest and celebrated the important events in the life of the community. A birth, a marriage or a coming-of-age ceremony all involved dance. Dances were thought to give people magical power over the elements … Dances were performed to invite the sun to rise and to bring the rain.

For VOYAGE Rosie Banchero (our RDT Dance Center on Broadway African teacher) taught us a traditional West African dance that we performed with live drummers!

Photo by Sharon Kain

 

FOLK DANCE around the World and the DABKE

Dabke is a traditional folk dance found all across the Middle East. It combines circle dancing and line dancing and is widely performed at weddings and other joyous occasions. Each country in the Middle East has their own version–some similar and some very different from each other. In some countries, anyone can dance the dabke. In others, it is only allowed for either men or women to dance the dabke.  In Jordan, there are 19 different types of the dabke dance.

Folk dances can be found all over the world and were some of the first dances to bring people together in celebration. Folk dances were used to create a sense of community and mark a special occasion.  What is your heritage and ethnicity? Do you have any folk dances that connect you to your background?  Do you know any of them?

P.S. – RDT will be performing the full evening-length work by Zvi Gotheiner, DABKE, April 6-8, 2017. 

ASIAN DANCES: MICHIO ITO

Ethnic dances from Asia have inspired American choreographers. An ancient form of theater in Japan known as Kabuki is a rich blend of music, dance and pantomime. It has spectacular staging and costuming and the movement is performed in a highly stylized manner. Kabuki has been a major theatrical form in Japan for almost 4 centuries and it inspired a Japanese-American dancer named Michio Ito to create modern dances that blend movement from both Eastern and Western Cultures about 100 years ago.

Photo by Sharon Kain

EAST INDIAN DANCE

Dance in India goes back thousands of years. It is one of the oldest forms in the world. Most of the classical dance in India has developed from a type of dance/drama in which performers act out a story from Hindu mythology almost exclusively through gestures. The complexity of the footwork lies in elaborate stamping rhythms and many dancers wear bells around their ankles, supplying their own accompaniment. The torso, face, arms and hands are extremely active. The head movement emphasizing the dancer’s changing facial expressions and the movement of the torso is graceful and fluid. The movement of the hands and arms is subtle and elaborate, every gesture has a function and a meaning. Indian dancers have a vast number of gestures through which they express complex events, ideas and emotions. For example, there are 13 gestures of the head, 36 different glances, and 67 hand gestures, that can, in different combinations, yield several thousand different meanings.

Raksha Karpoor (RDT’s Dance Center on Broadway BOLLYWOOD teacher) choreographed this awesome piece for us!

Photo by Sharon Kain

STEPPIN’

Steppin’ is an African American art form, a form of percussive dance in which the entire body is used as an instrument to produce complex rhythms and sounds through a mixture of footsteps, spoken word and hand claps. It is jazz, funk, rhythm and blues and rap without instruments.

Photo by Sharon Kain

We’ll be performing excerpts of this show on Saturday, March 11 at RDT’s Ring Around the Rose. Learn more here.

Thankful for RDT

Thankful for RDT

When it comes to RDT, our staff and dancers have so much to be thankful for!  We hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving and wish you joyous holiday season!  Below are some of the many things we are thankful for…

Filament_LIft

Pilar… I’m thankful for all the opportunities RDT offers to think outside the box. To do something you’ve done before but different. Always changing, always growing, even when it’s a repeat.

Lauren… I am thankful for my supportive family and friends, my health, and the leadership within RDT that has made it possible for me to do what I love every day.

David… They call theater the great “Imaginary Invalid,” a fragile enterprise that for whatever reason continues anyway, year-after-decade-after-century. Concert dance is of course an imaginary invalid as well. That Repertory Dance Theatre has maintained for 50 years would suggest that we are not quite as fragile as we sometimes might seem, especially to those behind the scenes. I would agree. And the big reason why is our stakeholders, which is what I’m grateful for this Thanksgiving. This group of patrons, advocates, students, teachers, donors (both cash and in-kind)–at every level from $1 to $30,000–are a testament to not only the loyalty of the RDT family, but the character of that family.

Ricklen… I am grateful for RDT’s unwavering commitment to the highest artistic ideals and for its significant focus on sharing the joy of movement in the schools and in the community, offering people of all ages an experience that, in its immediacy and intimacy, is both thrilling and profound.

Nick… I am grateful for the many things RDT has taught me and continues to teach me.  I am grateful for the opportunity to work for an organization that I believe in, that I support, and with people who make me a better person each day we are together.

Bolero_CropLynne: I am grateful for all the wonderful and inspiring students I teach everyday in RDT’s AIE Outreach Program.

Jaclyn: I am very grateful to have a job dancing that feels more like a calling. I feel so lucky to be challenged every day and excited about what I can share through the art form! I also appreciate the family nature that RDT is in my life. When you create something special together, it makes a lasting bond that manifests so magically on stage. Much thanks to RDT for making all of my dreams possible!

Efren Corado Garcia: I am grateful to live in Salt Lake City for continuing to recognize the importance of Arts and Culture, allowing RDT to serve as it’s ambassador and as one of the city’s precious jewels. Also, I am grateful to RDT for giving me the opportunity to be a part of its legacy.

Dan: I am thankful for the opportunity to be a part of a family, a family that encourages me to push myself, find an artistic voice, and give back to a beautiful artistic community through the art of dance.

Lacie: I am thankful for the challenges RDT provides that stretch and strengthen both my mind and body through the art of Dance.

Stephanie: I am grateful to be a part of the RDT team because even though I am not a performer, art is a part of my daily life. I love being able to share the work of this Company and I’m proud to be a part of it. When I grew up dancing I never thought I would get to work in the field, but I’m so grateful that now dance is a part of my everyday life.

Justin: Every year Thanksgiving reminds me of how blessed I am to be living out my dream and how RDT goes beyond in making that possible. Being able to represent dance in such a historical way with the rep we do takes my breathe away every season. I am always reminded that dance isn’t just performing but about educating the future on how it must be preserved and it’a rich history. Being apart of RDT gives me a purpose bigger than myself and how can’t I be thankful for that?