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Bringing RDT’s BRIO to the Classroom

Bringing RDT’s BRIO to the Classroom

Next week, RDT will perform two student matinees for close to 700 students. Before the students see BRIO, they will receive a study guide from our Education Director Lynne Larson to help them understand what they will see. Also, teachers are given lesson plans to help the students prepare for what they will see in the show. Here are some lesson plans you can try with your dance students. 


Lesson Plan—Small Area Choreography

Turf
Shapiro & Smith’s “Turf” performed by Katherine Winder and Ursula Perry.

In Turf and Jack, much of the choreography takes place in a small, defined space: In Jack, sitting or standing on a chair and in Turf, on small, large or rectangular rugs. To choreograph in small, defined spaces is a wonderful skill to develop and can lead to very innovative movement vocabulary.

  • Tape off a 2 X 4 area on the dance floor. Create as many as you can use for the number of students you have in your class. Students can work in pairs or alone.
  • Restrict the students’ movement creation to the space inside the tape.
    1. First Instruction: Create 8 gestures (a wave of the hand, a shrug of the shoulders, etc.) on various levels (high, medium and low) in the space.
    2. Second Instruction: Create 4 movements (a turn, a reach, a twist, etc.) facing different directions in the small space area.
    3. Third Instruction: Combine gestures and movements to create a phrase.
    4. Fourth Instruction: Show phrases to one another for feedback. Ask students watching what images came to mind while they were observing and also what type of sound might accompany the movement sequence.
    5. Students could then take some time to further develop their small space studies with the suggested imagery and music ideas. The same ideas could also be explored on a chair, in a big box, on a bench, etc.


Lesson Plan—Props and Dance

In the BRIO Concert, most of the dances use a prop. These props are quite ordinary and are objects found in your home and that you use every day:  blankets, chairs, and rugs. Using a prop in dance choreography can be challenging and unpredictable, but can also create wonderful movement vocabulary and images.

  • Ask the students to bring an object from home into class, something they use everyday. One of the wonderful things about props in creative dance is that we, as innovative, creative thinkers, can play and discover amazing new ways to use the prop other than the way it was intended.
    1. First Instruction: Talk with the students about the normal use of the prop and discourage them from “acting out” the normal uses of the object, but encourage them to think “outside the box” and create innovative and challenging ways to use the prop. Have them work on creating 4 unique ideas with their prop. If they would like to be in partners or groups to create, that is great. Allow each student time to create with their prop in the group, then switch to the next student to ensure all get creative work time. Once each student has 4 ideas with their prop, show to the class and give feedback.
    2. Second Instruction: Using the feedback with their 4 ideas, have students begin to develop movement phrases around their prop incorporating the innovations they already created and link them into a short movement/prop study.
      1. Ask them further questions, (for example, How is your prop introduced? What is its purpose? How does the movement relate to the prop?) to advance their studies even more.
Shapiro & Smith's "Dance With Two Army Blankets" featuring Nicholas Cendese, Joshua Larson, and Thayer Jonutz.
Shapiro & Smith’s “Dance With Two Army Blankets” featuring  Joshua Larson, Nicholas Cendese, and Thayer Jonutz.

 


 

Lesson Plan—Children’s Rhymes

In Jack and Pat-a-Cake, children’s nursery rhymes and games are used as the inspiration and accompaniment for both pieces. This is an interesting way to construct a piece using words, concepts and movements that are familiar to a large majority of our population. As in most universal experiences, rhymes and words such as the ones in Jack and Pat-a-Cake will mean different things to different people.

  • Ask the students to select a nursery rhyme that is special to them from their childhood. Have them do a little research to discover if there are variations to the rhyme, different wording, order, etc.
  • Using the text as a basis, have the students begin to develop movement motifs that represent the words of the rhyme. Once again, not “acting out” the rhyme, but taking the words and creating innovative movement from the meaning of the words.
  • Try either the mover reciting the rhyme as she/he is moving or another dancer reciting as the other moves. Show to the group.
Joanie Smith's "Jack" performed by Justin Bass and Tyler Orcutt.
Joanie Smith’s “Jack” performed by Tyler Orcutt and Justin Bass.

 

For more lesson plans and ideas about teaching in the classroom, check out the full BRIO study guide here>>

Ring Around the Rose Season kicks off!

Ring Around the Rose Season kicks off!

RDT’s Ring Around the Rose is a series of performances at our home, the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center that Repertory Dance Theatre presents each year. On the second Saturday of every month from September through May, we present a different performing arts group to an audience of children and their families.

On Saturday, September 10, the 19th season of Ring Around the Rose kicked off with one of our favorites … AFRICAN DRUMS! Deja Mitchell brought in a guest artist, Derrell “Sekou Soumah” Walker from Portland, Oregon and the two of them gave us all a look at African drumming and dancing.

Check out the fun we all had!

Check out our new photo booth for this year! Take photos in the lobby next time you come.
Our new photo booth this year will allow you to take photos in the lobby next time you come! Then, share them with your friends!

 

Our host for the show, Derrell "Sekou Soumah" Walker.
Our host for the show, Derrell “Sekou Soumah” Walker.

 

The audience takes their turn at playing the "djembes."
The audience takes their turn at playing the “djembes.”

 

More audience members try their hand!
More audience members try their hand!

 

Sekou Soumah smiles as he teaches the rhythms of West Africa.
Sekou Soumah smiles as he teaches the rhythms of West Africa.

 

The audience got to learn some authentic African dance moves!
The audience got to learn some authentic African dance moves!

 

Sekou Soumah let the audience follow along to learn the moves
Sekou Soumah let the audience follow along to learn the moves

 

We all had so much fun!
We all had so much fun!

Next month, we are thrilled to have Plan-B Theatre Company on the season for the first time! They will be presenting, THE EDIBLE COMPLEX on October 8.

Created for grades 4-6, THE EDIBLE COMPLEX is a comedy about ten-year-old Anna, who dreams of being a chef. She is also becoming aware of how her body is different from others at school. So, one day she decides to stop eating, but it’s hard to ignore your Food when it starts talking to you!

Featuring Anne Louise Brings and Dee-Dee Darby-Duffin, designed by Aaron Swenson, and directed by Cheryl Ann Cluff, THE EDIBLE COMPLEX is just one of 9 concerts that make up this year’s beloved Ring Around the Rose. And at just $5 per ticket ($4 if you buy a season package), it won’t break the bank to get your kids into an interactive, “wiggle-friendly” outing that will make them smile as big as Sekou Soumah’s at AFRICAN DRUMS!

Get tickets now>>