Creative Movement Lessons K-6th Grade

Creative Movement Lessons K-6th Grade

Are you looking for new ways to get your students engaged in their imagination? Or simply new prompts? Everything creative is found here

K-1st Grade

Alphabet Warm Up
Animals and Actions
Circles
Creative Ballet
Creative Sidewalk
Follow the Leader Warm Up
Freeze Dance: Action Word Challenge
Energy Room
Levels
Life Cycle of a Butterfly
Life Cycle of a Frog
Life Cycle of a Tree
Outdoor Relay Race
Where the Wild Things Are
Alphabet Warm Up

Follow along with Daniel as he leads a simple creative movement warm-up using the letters of the alphabet.

 

Animals and Actions

Megan shares a fun creative lesson that explores the actions and movement of animals.

 

Circles

Follow along with Lauren Curley as she leads a simple creative movement exercise for all ages that explores the many ways your body can circle.

 

Creative Ballet

Lauren shares a lesson that plays creatively with scarves and ballet.

 

Creative Sidewalk

RDT Dancer Dan Higgins shares a creative movement lesson that only requires a sidewalk!

 

Follow the Leader Warm Up

 

Warm up: Follow The Leader and Locomotor Movements

Turn on one of your favorite songs to dance to and pick a leader.

 

The leader will do movements (make sure to cover the whole body from head to toe) and everyone else will follow along trying to match the movements of the person leading. Do this for the whole song!

Next have another song ready. Come up with four or five locomotor movements or action words such as: swim, leap, skip, run, jump, crawl, spin, sleep etc. Put them in an order and try them out around the living room.

 

Example:
When the song begins pick an action word like “skip.” Turn on the song and skip around your space. When you stop the music everyone must freeze. Then choose the next action word. When the music turns on begin to “crawl.” Crawl until the music is paused. Do this for four to five more action words.

Freeze Dance: Action Word Challenge

 

Begin by brainstorming a list of action words (or verbs) together. Write them all down. Choose a person to be the caller. The caller will be in charge of starting and stopping the music and calling out each action word for each round of freeze dance.

 

Rules

  1. In this activity, everyone moves as the specific action word that is called out (example: skipping) as the music plays.
  2. When the music stops, each player must freeze immediately and hold that position until the music begins again.
  3. If a player does not freeze immediately, s/he does 10 jumping jacks during the start of the next round and then rejoins the next movement.
  4. Change the action word each time the music replays!
    Examples of action words (verbs): K-2: run, chop, jump, walk, kick, mix, crawl, fly, shake, skip, swim, tip toe, spin. 3rd-6th: climb, paint, search, celebrate, exercise, sneak, swim, leap, spin, stretch
Energy Room

Warm Up:

What are different activities that we do during the day compared to what we do at night. How do you yawn with your entire body when it wakes up? How is that different when you yawn before you go to bed? How do you collapse into bed at the end of the day? How do you spring out of bed when you had a good night’s sleep? Play with these ideas for a few minutes. If you feel like you need more direction maybe try collapsing and then rising with your entire body, and then isolate the idea to different parts of the body.

 

Explore:

What is energy? Energy is how movement happens. Think about the energy you just explored by examining the difference between day and night. When you first woke up were you heavy or light? Can you walk heavy and then try walking lightly? Try having a heavy arm and a light leg and move them around a bit. Now can you take that energy idea and move it in space with an action other than walking? Try hopping on a strong leg while moving your arms lightly.

 

Creating:

Here are a list of a few words that describe energy:

 

Tired
Excited
Calm
Powerful
Gentle
Sustained

 

Pick 4 or 5 words, then assign each word to a room in the house. It might look like this:

 

Living room: Tired
Kitchen: Powerful
Bedroom: Excited
Backyard: Calm

 

Use walking lightly to travel from one room to another. Once you enter a room you can only move with that energy. You could stay in the rooms for a long time, or try moving between them quickly. You could also assign a different level to each room. Imagine the ceiling is a different level in each room too! It might look like this now:

 

Living room: Tired on the low level
Kitchen: Powerful on the medium level
Bedroom: Excited on the low level
Backyard: Calm on the high level

 

You can create your own Energy house or follow the one above. This is fun to do with others as maybe you travel together or when one person enters a room the other has to leave.

 

Reflection:

What other energy words can you think of? What other rooms in your house would be fun to dance around in. Could you create your own energy stations outside? Is there a type of energy that is your favorite and one that isn’t?

Levels

Follow along with Jaclyn Brown as she leads a simple creative movement exercise that explores the many ways your body can circle.

 

Life Cycle of a Butterfly

Butterflies have four life stages, the egg, the larva (caterpillar), the pupa (chrysalis), and the adult butterfly. We will explore each of these stages with movement and storytelling. If you’d like to try this at home by yourself, follow along in the video or read the script below out loud to your children.

 

Lets begin with the first stage. The egg. Begin by making a small egg-like shape. The egg stage usually lasts 3-7 days.

 

The next stage is the larva (caterpillar). A small caterpillar hatches from its egg and eats its shell. The caterpillar will spend about 2-5 weeks in this phase and needs to eat a lot before it turns into the next stage. How can you eat, grow and move like a caterpillar?

After the caterpillar has eaten and grown it is ready to move into its next life stage, pupa (chrysalis). In this stage, the caterpillar attaches to a branch and then spins a string of silk around its body to attach to hold the chrysalis in place. Make your tight standing chrysalis shape. Most butterflies will stay in the chrysalis for 1-2 weeks.

 

Lastly, when the butterfly emerges from its chrysalis its wings are crumpled. At first the butterfly will hang with its wings down and will begin pumping the wings to straighten them out. Let’s practice hanging your wings and pumping them. Beginning with small pumps and growing into bigger ones. Once the wings harden and dry the butterfly can fly away. Let’s fly!

 

Life Cycle of a Frog

Lynne Larson, RDT's Education Director, walks through a fun creative lesson that explores the live cycle of a frog.

 

Warm Up:

Guide students through a warm-up using movement words that are associated with a frog, jumping, hopping, swimming, leaping, splashing, etc. Use levels, directions and speeds to help them ex-plore these movements creatively.

 

Investigating:

Discuss the stages of a frog’s lifecycle, from tadpole to a full grown frog. How do the differ-ent stages look, what movements can the different stages do, where are the stages taking place, land or water or both? Guide the students to move through each stage reflecting all the information they just pro-vided. You may want to use a white board or cards the information can be printed on to help them re-member or you can call out the information to them as they move.

 

Creating:

Have them put the stages together to make a sequence or dance. Start with them in the egg and go through all stages until they are a full grown frog. Show these to one another with music and see if you and the students can pick out all the stages as the students show their dances. What other animals or plants can you use to create a life cycle? Chicken, tree, etc.

 

Science Standard
LS1.B Standard 1.2.4: Construct an explanation of the patterns in the behaviors of parents and offspring which help offspring to sur-vive.
LS1.B Standard 3.2.1: Develop and use models to describe changes that organisms go through during their life cycles.

 

Life Cycle of a Tree

 

 

Objectives

  1. Exploring the life cycle, physicality, and appearance of a tree

Beginning/Introduction

Explain the rules:

  1. Good listeners who can pay attention
  2. Define the movement space and boundaries
  3. Be creative

Warm Up

Students will warmup their bodies with a growing seed exercise.

  1. Growing from a seed to a tree in 8,4,2,1 count(s)
  2. Wind blowing body, change branches
  3. Show different things on your branch
  4. Change levels
  5. Shake off everything that’s on you

Experience and Identify

Students will explore movement in their own bodies through the elements of dance with a physical tree in their movement space.

  1. SPACE: Can you reach and move around the positive and negative space of the tree, branches, etc?
  2. ENERGY: How can you embody what a tree feels like? (rough, stiff, etc.)
  3. TIME: How can you move slower or quicker in exploring the tree?

Create and Perform

Students will imagine and create their own unique tree. Then they will create a solo starting with their tree as a seed growing into its fullest form. In their dance, they will show all the unique traits that make up the character of their tree (what kind of branches, leaves, how tall, etc.).

Reflection

  1. Now that you have shown what your tree looks like through movement, can you share and describe what your tree looks like with words?
  2. What kind of an environment does your tree live in?
    a. Would your tree move differently if it lived in a colder/hotter environment?
Outdoor Relay Race

 

Activity: Outdoor Relay Race

Set up 4-5 land markers in an outdoor space. The first one being the starting line. If you have a bigger group/family divide yourself up into teams. Set a movement/action to do to get to each landmark forward and coming all the way back to the starting line.

 

Begin at the starting line doing 10 jumping jacks (count out loud). Once finished, skip to the second land marker. At the second mark do three frog jumps (counting out loud) and then bear crawl to the third landmark, from the 3rd to the fourth hop on one foot. Once you reach the fourth landmark, run all the way back to the starting line. Once the participant passes the starting line the next person may begin with the jumping jacks.

 

You can replace any of these movements to adjust it to any level!

Where the Wild Things Are

Join Elle as she teaches a creative movement lesson for Kindergartners and 1st Graders based on the book “Where the Wild Things Are.”

 

Intro:

What are some of your favorite stories? Have you ever seen a play or musical where a story comes to life? One way dance has been utilized is to tell stories. Let’s use dance to tell the story of Max in “Where the Wild Things Are.”

 

Warm Up:

Try walking in all different directions (forward, sideways, backwards) all through the space. One students understand they can choose what direction they walk in add a level to the walk. “Can you walk sideways on a low level.” Continue playing with directions and levels until they are a bit warmer. Then ask what other ways can we move? Can we hop, skip, jump in different directions and levels? Again, do this until the students seem to understand and have a grasp on actions words, levels, and directions.

 

Creating:

Read “Where the Wild Things Are” Give the following prompts as you read:

  • - Wolf Suit: Sneaking around on a Low Level
  • - Eat you up: How can we chew with different body parts?
  • - A forest grew: Start on a low level, grow to a tall tree, shake your leaves off, then get small again
  • - Ocean: Swishing, sailing, swimming around the room on a Medium Level with different body parts
  • - Wild Things: Quickly skipping on a high Level until they freeze on one leg
  • - And it was still hot: Move quickly on a High, Medium, or Low level

Can students remember all the actions done for the entire book? Try reading the story again, and when you say the word/phrase see if they can remember what to do without a prompt from you.

 

Reflection:

Do you have a favorite story you could turn into a dance? Any story can be turned into a movement story! Do this process in reverse and come up with our own movement story and see if someone can guess what the story is about. Doing this with other books or activities might be able to help with a child’s ability to memorize a story or remember a series of events.

2nd-3rd Grade

Animals
Creative Relay
Creative Sidewalk
Follow the Leader Warm Up
Freeze Dance: Action Word Challenge
Energy Room
Levels
Levels, Actions, Pathways
Living Things
Outdoor Relay Race
Locomotor, Negative Space and Positive Space
Rocks
Rhythm
Rhythm and Counting
Simple Machines
The Sun and Moon
Time, Space, Energy #1
Time, Space, Energy #2
Time, Space, Energy #3
Verbs and Adverbs
Write Your Name
Animals

Creative Movement exercise exploring animals and the habitats they live in taught by RDT's education director Lynne Larson.

 

Creative Relay

Creative Movement activity centered around the format of a relay race taught by RDT's Education Director Lynne Larson.

 

Creative Sidewalk

RDT Dancer Dan Higgins shares a creative movement lesson that only requires a sidewalk!

 

Follow the Leader Warm Up

 

Warm up: Follow The Leader and Locomotor Movements

Turn on one of your favorite songs to dance to and pick a leader.

 

The leader will do movements (make sure to cover the whole body from head to toe) and everyone else will follow along trying to match the movements of the person leading. Do this for the whole song!

Next have another song ready. Come up with four or five locomotor movements or action words such as: swim, leap, skip, run, jump, crawl, spin, sleep etc. Put them in an order and try them out around the living room.

 

Example:
When the song begins pick an action word like “skip.” Turn on the song and skip around your space. When you stop the music everyone must freeze. Then choose the next action word. When the music turns on begin to “crawl.” Crawl until the music is paused. Do this for four to five more action words.

Freeze Dance: Action Word Challenge

 

Begin by brainstorming a list of action words (or verbs) together. Write them all down. Choose a person to be the caller. The caller will be in charge of starting and stopping the music and calling out each action word for each round of freeze dance.

 

Rules

  1. In this activity, everyone moves as the specific action word that is called out (example: skipping) as the music plays.
  2. When the music stops, each player must freeze immediately and hold that position until the music begins again.
  3. If a player does not freeze immediately, s/he does 10 jumping jacks during the start of the next round and then rejoins the next movement.
  4. Change the action word each time the music replays!
    Examples of action words (verbs): K-2: run, chop, jump, walk, kick, mix, crawl, fly, shake, skip, swim, tip toe, spin. 3rd-6th: climb, paint, search, celebrate, exercise, sneak, swim, leap, spin, stretch
Energy Room

Warm Up:

What are different activities that we do during the day compared to what we do at night. How do you yawn with your entire body when it wakes up? How is that different when you yawn before you go to bed? How do you collapse into bed at the end of the day? How do you spring out of bed when you had a good night’s sleep? Play with these ideas for a few minutes. If you feel like you need more direction maybe try collapsing and then rising with your entire body, and then isolate the idea to different parts of the body.

 

Explore:

What is energy? Energy is how movement happens. Think about the energy you just explored by examining the difference between day and night. When you first woke up were you heavy or light? Can you walk heavy and then try walking lightly? Try having a heavy arm and a light leg and move them around a bit. Now can you take that energy idea and move it in space with an action other than walking? Try hopping on a strong leg while moving your arms lightly.

 

Creating:

Here are a list of a few words that describe energy:

 

Tired
Excited
Calm
Powerful
Gentle
Sustained

 

Pick 4 or 5 words, then assign each word to a room in the house. It might look like this:

 

Living room: Tired
Kitchen: Powerful
Bedroom: Excited
Backyard: Calm

 

Use walking lightly to travel from one room to another. Once you enter a room you can only move with that energy. You could stay in the rooms for a long time, or try moving between them quickly. You could also assign a different level to each room. Imagine the ceiling is a different level in each room too! It might look like this now:

 

Living room: Tired on the low level
Kitchen: Powerful on the medium level
Bedroom: Excited on the low level
Backyard: Calm on the high level

 

You can create your own Energy house or follow the one above. This is fun to do with others as maybe you travel together or when one person enters a room the other has to leave.

 

Reflection:

What other energy words can you think of? What other rooms in your house would be fun to dance around in. Could you create your own energy stations outside? Is there a type of energy that is your favorite and one that isn’t?

Levels

Follow along with Jaclyn Brown as she leads a simple creative movement exercise that explores the many ways your body can circle.

 

Levels, Actions, Pathways

Join RDT Dancer Lauren for a short creative movement class exploring levels, actions, and pathways.

 

 

 

Living Things

A lesson on Living Things by Lynne Larson

 

Warm Up

Guide students through a warm-up using words that move and then stillness. Add levels of space (low, medium and high) and directions (forward, sideways, and backwards) and speeds (slow, medi-um and fast). Explore the different ways the body can demonstrate stillness. Work with the students on achieving a fully frozen shape eliminating even the smallest movement. Then add designs to their body, “show me a frozen shape that is straight, curved, twisted, stretchy, zig-zag, bent, wide, narrow, big, small, pointy, etc.” What is a pattern? An order of things that repeats. Discuss and then guide them through some moving examples, such as skipping, frozen straight shape, skipping, frozen straight shape.

 

Investigation:

What do living things need to make them “living”? Air, Water, food source, habitat (shelter) Make a list of living things, what are the similarities and what are the differences? Explore these things in movement. What are the patterns in the needs of living things and the places they live? Practice some of these answers in movement. What is a non-living thing? Discuss examples. Create shapes that portray non-living things.

 

Creating

Instruct students to select 3 of the similarities of living things in a particular habitat, such as a for-est, or desert and create their own movement pattern. Using levels, directions, speeds and shaping from the warm-up above.

 

Science Standard
LS1.A Standard 2.2.4: Design a solution to a human problem by mimicking the structure and function of plants and/or animals
and how they use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs. Define the problem by asking questions and gathering information, convey designs through sketches, drawings, or physical models, and compare and test designs.
LS1.C: Standard K.2.1: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.

Outdoor Relay Race

 

Activity: Outdoor Relay Race

Set up 4-5 land markers in an outdoor space. The first one being the starting line. If you have a bigger group/family divide yourself up into teams. Set a movement/action to do to get to each landmark forward and coming all the way back to the starting line.

 

Begin at the starting line doing 10 jumping jacks (count out loud). Once finished, skip to the second land marker. At the second mark do three frog jumps (counting out loud) and then bear crawl to the third landmark, from the 3rd to the fourth hop on one foot. Once you reach the fourth landmark, run all the way back to the starting line. Once the participant passes the starting line the next person may begin with the jumping jacks.

 

You can replace any of these movements to adjust it to any level!

Locomotor, Negative Space and Positive Space

 

Objectives:

  1. Explore different loco-motor pathways and levels
  2. Explore positive and negative space

 

Beginning/Introduction

Explain the rules:

  1. Good listeners who can pay attention
  2. Define the movement space and boundaries
  3. Be creative

 

Warm-up

Students will begein class with a head to toe exploration as they isolate each body part with movement.

 

Experience and Identify

Students will move on to exploring locomotor pathways (forward, backwards, and sideways). Then the students will add exploring levels in space (high, medium, and low) and playing with time (fast and slow).

 

The next part of class will be about exploring positive and negative space with a piece of furniture in the movement space. Positive space is the space that the body takes up.

 

Create and Perform

Students will create an exploratory dance choosing on their own when to investigate positive and negative space with different body parts around the object.

 

Reflection

  1. What are different levels in space you can explore?
  2. How can you explore all of the positive and negative space around your house?
Rocks

Lynne Larson teaches a lesson that uses different types of rocks.

 

Warm Up:

8 counts to walk, 8 counts to reach in many different levels, 8 counts of jumping jacks, 8 counts to go to the floor, roll 1 time and stand up by the count of “8”. Ask the students for different actions that could take the place of the 4 above and try again.

Investigating:

Discuss with the students the 3 types of rocks (igneous, metamorphic, sedimentary). What are the characteristics of each? Can these characteristics be transferred into shape? Divide the students into small groups and have them create a shape for each type of rock, in all 3 unique shapes. Show one another. Then begin to discuss how each rock feels, looks, etc. Is one rough, smooth, bumpy, etc. Have the students move around the room in these ways, For example, who can show a bumpy walk, or a smooth run, etc.

Create:

Return to the groups where the rock shapes were created. Now ask them to create a way to move that reflects how each rock could be described by touch or sight. Then add these movements to their orig-inal shapes. So, make the Igneous rock shape, then show us the Igneous Rock Movement.

 

Science Standard
ESS1.C Standard 4.1.4: Engage in argument from evidence based on patterns in rock layers and fossils found in those layers to support an explanation that environments have changed over time.
Great match to middle school… ESS2.A Standard 7.2.1: Develop a model of the rock cycle to describe the relationship between energy flow and matter cycling that create igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks.

Rhythm

Join RDT's Director of Education Lynne Larson in a creative movement exercise that focuses on rhythm as well as straight, curved, and angular lines.

 

Rhythm and Counting

Follow along with Megan O'Brien, our Education Specialist, as she leads a rhythm and counting brain break.

 

Simple Machines

Creative Movement exercise exploring the six simple machines taught by RDT's education director Lynne Larson.

 

The Sun and Moon

Lynne Larson presents a creative lesson that explores the movements of our solar system through dance.

 

Warm Up:

Begin the warm-up with simple instructions of rising and setting. Could the body rise in one ar-ea of the space, travel across the room and set in another. Practice this a few times with the students cre-ating different traveling ways with each rise and set.

 

Investigating:

Guide the students through shaping and movements that are straight, angular (zig-zag) and curved. Instruct them to create a straight shape at a high level, curved at medium and angular at low level and memorize each. Then transition from one to the other as slow as possible, then as fast as possible. Discuss the phases of the moon. Have the students create shapes in their bodies that correspond to each moon phase, using the curves, angles and straight lines that were explored in the warm-up. Can then move slowly from one phase to the next, what about fast?

 

Creating:

Divide the students into groups of four or five. Assign each one a different phase of the moon and have them create a group shape that corresponds to their phase. Show these to one another. Then put a sun and earth in the center of the space and have the phases rotate around them positioning them in their phase rotation. Students can dance to the spot and away to show their shapes.

 

Science Standard
ESS1.A Standard 1.1.1: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the movement ofthe Sun, Moon, and stars to describe predictable patterns.

Time, Space, Energy #1

Join RDT's education director Lynne Larson for an elementary aged creative movement class that focuses on the three elements of dance. Part one of three.

 

Time, Space, Energy #2

Join RDT's Education Director Lynne Larson for part two of her Time, Space, and Energy creative movement class!

 

Time, Space, Energy #3

Join RDT's Education Director Lynne Larson for part three of her Time, Space, and Energy creative movement class!

 

Verbs and Adverbs

Join RDT's director of education Lynne Larson for an interactive lesson exploring verbs, adverbs, and patterns.

 

Write Your Name

Follow along with RDT Dancer Jonathan Kim as he leads a simple creative movement exercise using your name as a way to generate movement.

 

4th-6th Grade

8 8 4 4 2 2 1 1
Isolations, Actions, and Patterns
Follow the Leader Warm Up
Freeze Dance: Action Word Challenge
Matter
Outdoor Relay Race
Potential and Kinetic Energy
Time, Space, Energy #1
Time, Space, Energy #2
Time, Space, Energy #3
Water and Erosion
8 8 4 4 2 2 1 1

Join RDT's Education Director Lynne Larson for this rhythm and math based lesson.

 

Isolations, Actions, and Patterns

Creative Movement class exploring Isolations, Actions, and Patterns taught by RDT's Education Director Lynne Larson.

 

Follow the Leader Warm Up

 

Warm up: Follow The Leader and Locomotor Movements

Turn on one of your favorite songs to dance to and pick a leader.

 

The leader will do movements (make sure to cover the whole body from head to toe) and everyone else will follow along trying to match the movements of the person leading. Do this for the whole song!

Next have another song ready. Come up with four or five locomotor movements or action words such as: swim, leap, skip, run, jump, crawl, spin, sleep etc. Put them in an order and try them out around the living room.

 

Example:
When the song begins pick an action word like “skip.” Turn on the song and skip around your space. When you stop the music everyone must freeze. Then choose the next action word. When the music turns on begin to “crawl.” Crawl until the music is paused. Do this for four to five more action words.

Freeze Dance: Action Word Challenge

 

Begin by brainstorming a list of action words (or verbs) together. Write them all down. Choose a person to be the caller. The caller will be in charge of starting and stopping the music and calling out each action word for each round of freeze dance.

 

Rules

  1. In this activity, everyone moves as the specific action word that is called out (example: skipping) as the music plays.
  2. When the music stops, each player must freeze immediately and hold that position until the music begins again.
  3. If a player does not freeze immediately, s/he does 10 jumping jacks during the start of the next round and then rejoins the next movement.
  4. Change the action word each time the music replays!
    Examples of action words (verbs): K-2: run, chop, jump, walk, kick, mix, crawl, fly, shake, skip, swim, tip toe, spin. 3rd-6th: climb, paint, search, celebrate, exercise, sneak, swim, leap, spin, stretch
Matter

Lynne Larson presents a lesson plan that explores science with movement through the subject of matter.

 

Warm Up:

Have the students walk quickly through the space without touching one another, then slow the speed to a medium speed, then to very slow. Try the same with running or any other action word the students can think of to try.

 

Investigating:

Discuss the three states of matter with the students, Solid, Liquid and Gas. Then using the space of the room, or marks on the floor, select a small space and have all the students get inside that space. Then using the characteristics of a solid have them move extremely slow close together, making a solid. There should be levels, and volume as they attempt to fill the space. Repeat with a slightly larger space and this time, they will represent a liquid. The movements will be a medium speed, there will be levels and they will be a little further apart from one another and moving to fill up the space at all levels. Repeat a third time with the largest space. This time they will represent a gas. The movements will be very fast, they students will be far from one another attempting to fill the space at all levels.

 

Creating:

Have the students show a physical reaction in movement. Water freezing, then melting. Or pouring acetone on a Styrofoam cup. These are experiments that are being done in their classrooms. Have them recreate them in movement. What happens when substances mix? Try creating some with movement and showing the results to the class.

 

Science Standards
PS1.A Standard 2.3.3: Develop and use a model to describe how an object, made of a small set of pieces, can be disassembled and re-shaped into a new object with a different function.
PS1.A Standard 5.2.1: Develop and use a model to describe that matter is made of particles on a scale that istoo small to be seen.
PS1.A Standard 5.2.2: Ask questions to plan and carry out investigations to identify substances based onpatterns of their properties.

Outdoor Relay Race

 

Activity: Outdoor Relay Race

Set up 4-5 land markers in an outdoor space. The first one being the starting line. If you have a bigger group/family divide yourself up into teams. Set a movement/action to do to get to each landmark forward and coming all the way back to the starting line.

 

Begin at the starting line doing 10 jumping jacks (count out loud). Once finished, skip to the second land marker. At the second mark do three frog jumps (counting out loud) and then bear crawl to the third landmark, from the 3rd to the fourth hop on one foot. Once you reach the fourth landmark, run all the way back to the starting line. Once the participant passes the starting line the next person may begin with the jumping jacks.

 

You can replace any of these movements to adjust it to any level!

Potential and Kinetic Energy

Join RDT's Education director Lynne Larson for a lesson all about potential and kinetic energy!

 

 

Time, Space, Energy #1

Join RDT's education director Lynne Larson for an elementary aged creative movement class that focuses on the three elements of dance. Part one of three.

 

Time, Space, Energy #2

Join RDT's Education Director Lynne Larson for part two of her Time, Space, and Energy creative movement class!

 

Time, Space, Energy #3

Join RDT's Education Director Lynne Larson for part three of her Time, Space, and Energy creative movement class!

 

Water and Erosion

Lynne Larson shares a creative movement lesson based off of water and erosion.

 

Warm-Up:

Use water imagery as warm-up material. Water falls, it drops, it flows, travels in currents, pools, drips, fills up the space provided, erodes.

 

Investigating #1:

Discuss the various places water is stored on the earth, glaciers, oceans, ponds, etc. Discuss the processes of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation. Using movement, have the students explore the concepts just discussed using their bodies. For evaporation, explore slow ascending motions, that use all parts of the bodies different directions ascending in spiral way, a wavy way in a straight way…for condensation, explore ways that the water molecules condense to form clouds, and how they fall to earth in different forms of precipitation. Explore, rain, hail, snow, fog, etc. At this point, discuss with the students the types of clouds (cirrus, cumulus, stratus, etc.). What are their characteristics? How are they different from one another? What are their shapes? Which of these produce precipitation?

 

Create #1:

Put students in small groups, first have them create cloud shapes that match the cloud types dis-cussed above, how would these clouds change shape as the moved through the atmosphere by the wind? Then, have them create their own water cycle, moving through each part, showing the characteristics of each phase. They can choose their form of precipitation and cloud formation.

 

Investigating #2

Discuss positive and negative space. The positive space is the space the body takes up, negative is the space that is empty. Have the students in pairs and then using shaping ideas, have one partner create a shape and have the 2nd partner connect to the person’s negative space. Trade who is the leader and go through this a few times. You can repeat this exercise with positive space as well.

 

Create #2

Have the students practice creating a giant land form using positive and negative space, and many levels. Select yourself (teacher) or another student to be the water that will erode away part of the land form. Tap students on the shoulder and have them remove themselves from the formation. Select about half the class and then see what is left of the “eroded” landscape.

 

Science Standard
ESS2.D Standard K.1.1: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about local, observable weather conditions to describe patterns over time.
ESS2.D Standard 3.1.1: Analyze and interpret data to reveal patterns that indicate typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.


RDT appreciates the generous funding provided by the Utah Legislature and the Utah Board of Education that help make our Arts-in-Education Programs possible in Utah’s Public Schools.